Health


Health care

For medical emergency call 113

In Norway, public health services are divided into two sectors: Primary health care deals with general health issues and is provided locally by general practitioners and community nurses. The specialised health care sector provides health services by specialists and hospitals. Appointments with specialists and hospitals require referral from a primary health care provider. For more in-depth information about Norwegian health care services see The Norwegian Board of Health (helsetilsynet.no).
 

Finding a doctor

  • If your stay in Norway exceeds six months (and thus requires that you notify the National Registry (folkeregister) of your move to Norway) you will automatically be assigned a regular general practitioner (fastlege) by your local social security office (Norwegian) (nav.no).
     
    For more information about the General Practitioner (GP) Scheme, please visit helsenorge.no.

  • If your stay in Norway is temporary (i.e. six months or less) and you need medical attention, the municipal service office in the area where you are staying will advise you on which doctor to contact. If you are living in Ås, call 64 96 20 00 or see Ås kommune  (as.kommune.no) (Norwegian).
     
    For more information about health care benefits during a temporary stay in Norway, please visit helsenorge.no.

  • Outside regular office hours and in cases of emergency, visit the nearest Emergency Clinic (legevakt). All municipalities in Norway have a Public Emergency Room which is open day and night. Call 116 117 to get in contact with the closest Public Emergency Room. When it's a matter of life or death, call 113.

  • Health services are also provided by a large number of private clinics. Many of them are open in the evening and on weekends. However, they tend to be quite costly. Here is a list of private clinics that are open in the evening and on weekends, selected at random from Yellow Pages:

Hospital treatment

  • You can be referred to a hospital by your regular GP or an other primary health care doctor. If you are referred to a hospital, you can choose which one you would like to be treated at. See Free Hospital Choice Norway (frittsykehusvalg.no) for further information on treatment capabilities at hospitals across the country.
  • In an emergency, you can go to the nearest Emergency Clinic (legevakt). Call 116117 or Follo Legevakt; 64 87 19 30. Follo legevakt is located at Ski Hospital, Vardåsveien 3, Ski, see map.
      

Health insurance

When employed by a Norwegian employer

  • Anyone formally employed by a Norwegian employer automatically becomes a member of the Norwegian National Health Scheme as of the first day of work.

When not employed by a Norwegian employer

  • Foreign nationals staying in Norway for less than 3 months without formal employement by a Norwegian employer are considered tourists and must have their own travel insurance. EU/EEA nationals should also bring their European Health Insurance Card.
  • Citizens from a non-EU/EEA country staying in Norway for 3-12 months may apply for voluntary membership in the Norwegian National Health Scheme (NNHS) upon arrival in Norway.
    • Fill out the form Application for insurance during stay in Norway (pdf) (nav.no) and return it to your local social security office (Norwegian) (nav.no).
    • Whether you will be granted coverage depends on whether your country has a social security agreement with Norway, and the nature of your residence permit.
    • Generally, if you are unable to obtain health insurance from your home country, you will be granted coverage here.  Medical coverage concerns conditions that necessitate immediate treatment and may be restricted in some instances.
  • Citizens from a non-EU/EEA country staying here for more than 12 months will almost always automatically become members in the Norwegian National Health Scheme once they register with the Norwegian Population Registry (Folkeregister). Read more about Membership in the National Insurance Scheme here (nav.no).
  • Citizens from Nordic countries (Denmark, Sweden, Finland, or Iceland) are entitled to coverage of medical expenses in cases where medical condition necessitates immediate treatment. It is important to register with the Norwegian Population Registry (Folkeregister) if you will be living in Norway for more than 6 months.
  • Citizens from the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland are entitled to coverage of medical expenses in cases where medical condition necessitates immediate treatment. Present your valid passport when seeking treatment.
  • Citizens from EU/EEA countries, who present an European Health Insurance Card (helsenorge.no), will be given medical treatment in Norway in cases where medical condition necessitates immediate treatment.
     

Patient user fee

A patient user fee (egenandel) is required when consulting a doctor. The patient user fee for an ordinary consultation is NOK 141 (as of 2016). If your patient user fees exceed a certain limit (egenandelstak), you will receive an exemption card (frikort) (helsenorge.no) that entitles you to free health care for the rest of the year. You will receive this exemption card automatically in the mail within three weeks from when you have paid more than NOK 2,185 in user fees in 2016.

Under the following circumstances medical treatment is free of charge:

  • When you are admitted to hospital and are a member of the National Insurance Scheme, you do not pay for treatment, medication or hospital accommodation.
  • Expectant mothers do not pay for pregnancy check-ups.
  • Children under the age of 16 do not pay any medical user fees, and anyone under the age of 18 who requires psychological help does not have to pay any treatment fees.

Dental care

Published 9. April 2014 - 10:48 - Updated 25. June 2018 - 11:11

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU)

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